Simple and Compound Inflorescences

Simple Inflorescences

297px-Traube_(inflorescence)Raceme

100px-Inflorescences_Spike_Kwiatostan_Kłos

Spike

479px-Schirmtraube_(inflorescence)

Racemose

600px-Inflorescences_Umbel_Kwiatostan_Baldach

Umbel

184px-Kolben_(inflorescence)

Spadix

262px-Koepfchen_(inflorescence)

Head

320px-Kaetzchen_(inflorescence)

Catkin (racemose or spicate)

 Compound Inflorescences

350px-Inflorescences_Panicle_Kwiatostan_Wiecha

Panicle

637px-Schirmrispe_(inflorescence)

Cymose

482px-Spirre_(inflorescence)

Anthela

Disjunkt_heterokladische_Thyrse_(inflorescence)

Thyrse

305px-Dichasialer_zymus_(inflorescence)

Thyrsoid

7 thoughts on “Simple and Compound Inflorescences

  1. Amazing… I so love these diagrams.. And taking the Fibonacci sequence in nature I have always held the belief that we are ALL connected… to everything else.. 🙂 when you see this in motion you begin to see why. 🙂 thank you

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    • Thanks. It’s really a botanical term called ‘phyllotaxis’. It is the arrangement of leaves on a plant stem (from Ancient Greek phýllon “leaf” and táxis “arrangement”). Phyllotactic spirals form a distinctive class of patterns in nature. It means that in plants leaves can be ‘opposite’, or ‘alternate’ (when a spiral forms as in a ‘rosette) This ‘symmetry’ and ‘asymmetry’ is related to what is called a ‘Fibonacci’s sequence’ but what it consists of really is a concept of classical geometry which has greatly influenced architecture, such as in building staircases following spiralled designs; building columns following repeating patterns in nature such as bamboo columns or palm trees. It has its roots in geometry but inspired by nature. The diagrams posted here are an example of both symmetrical and asymmetrical growth and patterns in plants, which are helpful to know because not all flowers are solitary. Many grow in racemes, spikes, umbels, and panicles. Often ‘raceme’ is the best known, yet there are others that are structurally different. The concept ‘revived’ in the 19th C with ‘Art Nouveau’.

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